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Have something you don't know what to do with???

Moving, Spring Cleaning, and just basic cleaning out, comes with its fair share of stresses, not the least of which is the dreaded de-cluttering process. It's a necessary but potentially painful project, especially for those homeowners who are admitted packrats. To make it easier to take stock of what you need to get rid of, any organizing professional will tell you to separate your stuff into three piles: Keep, Sell or Donate and Toss.

That sounds easy enough, but the next step is figuring out exactly what to do with everything that ends up in your "toss" pile - and everything else that you can't sell or drop off to your local thrift store or donation center.
You have a few options.

1. Donate It

1. Donate It

It should be fairly easy to donate most of your things; you probably know plenty of charities that will take furniture, books and toys. Most clothes can go to Goodwill, The Salvation Army, or MidCoast Family Services. But if you're still stuck with unwanted items, try some of the donation options below before you head out to your trash bin.

2. Give It Away

2. Give It Away

Some of your things will prove impossible to donate or recycle. If you don't want to trash that bubble wrap and all of those boxes you just unpacked, someone who's moving will gladly them off your hands. And even if you can't find a buyer for your rusted bike or old rug, chances are somebody will snap it up for free if you post it on a site like:

  • Freecycle.org
  • Online classifieds
  • Neighborhood listservs
  • Facebook yard-sale groups

You'd be amazed at what people will take.

3. Dispose of It

3. Dispose of It

Next are the items that you must get rid of in a specific way. Potentially hazardous materials like paint, batteries, household cleaners, antifreeze, expired medications, motor oil, and pesticides should never be casually tossed into the trash, dumped into the sink, or flushed down the toilet. Each one will have a different disposal method, but there are some guidelines to keep in mind.
Follow the disposal instructions on the container. Most of these items will have detailed directions.
Keep the substance in its original container.

Don't mix two different hazardous materials together when disposing of them.
Your community might have a hazardous-materials collection center or sponsor drug take-back events. You could also pay a disposal service like White Trash Services (361) 550-1826 to take care of any questionable items. Though below are a few options for those exact questionable items.

  • Paint - We recommend to take it to the habitat for humanity restore. You could possibly get a tax deduction if donated! If the paint is no longer liquid and completely dried up, you can then dispose of it in your trash service.
  • Metal scrap - If you would like us to pick up scraps metal there is a small charge for that! Though if you wish to take it yourselves then we recommend A+ Metal Recycling 361-582-0199 or CMC Metals.
  • Cement - Left over cement/concrete? Call our friends at Trinity Crushed Concrete at 361-580-1000 or visit their website here.
  • Furniture - We recommend to contact your local Habitat for Humanity. They take furniture, paint and unwanted building material such as trim, wood, lighting, plumbing and electrical supplies. If you can't transport or move the furniture, we can do this for a small price!

4. Trash It

4. Trash It

Sometimes, one man's junk is just, well, junk. If you've done your due diligence and still haven't found a responsible way to get rid of certain things, you probably just need to call White Trash Services (361) 550-1826 and have us come pick it up for a nominal fee.